12/10/2012

NEXT POST
Generations of Principals Lead Change Differently The Soviets launch Sputnik, President John F. Kennedy is assassinated, OPEC enacts an oil embargo, the Challenger Shuttle explodes, or the World Trade Center falls—these events and others help to define generations. Because a generation has a shared memory of important events, it also shares similar assumptions about what matters based on their formative experiences (Raines, 1997; Kunreuther, 2008). Therefore, generations can influence people’s perspectives and behaviors. School leaders may not be aware of their generation’s effect on the way they lead change. But awareness of these influences can help principals use reflective practice, consider their effectiveness as a leader, and adopt new behaviors. These changes can improve overall school organization and increase the efficacy of leaders as they become more aware of their influence. For instance, Gen-X principals tend to use decisive, yet inclusive decision-making processes, which may help in leading change more effectively than other generations. I recently finished Leading Schools through a Generational Lens (Kuhn, 2012) that identifies these generational differences in leadership. Connecting my data to the 21 leadership responsibilities from McREL’s Balanced Leadership Profile® research, I found five major trends: A significant gap exists between how principals and teachers perceive the same change. Principals tended to see the changes they led as 2nd order (i.e., a change that is significantly and fundamentally different) by a much larger margin than their teachers. This gap was significantly greater for Gen-X principals. The top and bottom five leadership responsibilities were similar across generations. Teachers rated the top five...
PREVIOUS POST
The Sandy Hook Elementary tragedy: Resources for educators Here at McREL, we are heartbroken by the tragedy that occurred last Friday at Sandy Hook Elementary School. To the families in Newtown, Connecticut, and across the country who are grieving the loss of loved ones, please know that our thoughts and prayers are with you. For educators and families anywhere who are in need of some assistance helping children through the continuing effects of this tragedy, please consider the following resources: American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Children and Grief This article describes the normal reactions to expect from young children when they lose a loved one as well as behaviors that indicate professional help is needed. American Academy of Pediatrics: Resources to Help Parents, Children and Others Cope in the Aftermath of School Shootings AAP provides a list of resources for parents/teachers, students, and schools to help cope specifically with the effects of school shootings. National Association of School Psychologists: Helping Children Cope - Tips for Parents and Teachers This handout offers advice for adults, parents, and schools to help children cope with any kind of national tragedy. PBS: Talking with Kids About News PBS offers general strategies for talking and listening to children about news events. U.S. Dep’t of Health and Human Services: Tips for Talking to Children and Youth After Traumatic Events - A Guide for Parents and Educators This brief explains common reactions to traumatic events by preschoolers, young children, and adolescents, and provides tips for helping children and for getting professional help when...

Recent Comments